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Overview to Wales: Travel Guide and Tourist Information

Wales

Wales' landscape epitomizes the lush natural beauty of a pre-industrial age: rolling fields climb effortlessly up through the mist to impressively rocky mountains; craggy gorges surrounded by miles of silent pine forests… It’s a genuinely inspiring sight.

It’s unsurprising, then, that the Welsh landscape holds a particular fascination for the adventure traveler. It’s not a big place, but for the lover of the great outdoors, Wales is backpacking territory like few others.

In this respect, the huge national park of the Brecon Beacons particularly stands out. The Beacons provide a picture-perfect landscape, which, despite being a climbing mecca, is still not too severe to put off your average trekker.

Hanging to the southwestern tip of Wales, Pembrokeshire is essentially more of the same, although here the landscape is characterized by the sharp cliffs and sharper winds that come with the coastal territory. Pembroke town provides a perfect respite, along with a grand castle.

To the north sits the arty, enclosed enclave of Aberystwyth – a surprising haven to students and backpackers alike. To the east, on the other hand, lies Dylan Thomas’ beloved town of Swansea, whose Castle and Guildhall make for a pleasant day’s sightseeing. 
 
In terms of population, Swansea is eclipsed only by the capital of Cardiff, a bustling and vibrant mixture of century-old arcades and shiny modern shopping malls. Its surrounding coal-mines may be long gone, but in-depth museums remain to remind of what once was.

But while Wales has its fair share of engaging towns and cities, what really sets it apart are its rugged landscapes. For a small country, Wales is unusually blessed with an abundance of greenery, wildlife and unforgettable natural beauty.


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