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Overview to Galway: Travel Guide and Tourist Information

Galway from the Sea

Although it’s not a huge city, Galway throws itself into its nightly revels with the enthusiasm of a place several times its size. Friendly and unpretentious, the city is held to be the best destination for nightlife in the whole of Ireland.

The cozy old pubs of Shop Street and, particularly, Quay Street (the city’s ‘Left Bank’), are good for both picking up a bite to eat and sinking a few pints of Guinness later on. Food-wise, Galway’s oysters are so renowned that the city holds an entire festival in their honor!

And festivals don’t stop there; the Galway Arts Festival and the Galway Races are also highlights of the calendar, as well as being prime examples of a city that seems either reluctant to be - or incapable of - reining itself in.

Aside from the pubs, bars and seemingly endless festivities, Galway is a fine old town. Shop Street is home to Lynch’s Castle, an attractive fortified townhouse, while at the heart of the city, Eyre Square is surrounded by the shopping district.

Beyond the city, the wild, windswept southwest of Ireland is among the most beautiful parts of the country. The National Park area of the Burren is a bare landscape of rock and ancient dolmens. A little further afield, Connemara National Park is also stunning.

The Aran Islands are a mere 30 miles from the city itself and make a wonderful daytrip. Marooned in the Atlantic, they are part of the Gaeltacht (or Irish-speaking) area of the county and have managed to keep much of their traditional way of life.

Galway is, in short, a fantastic little city – the perfect place for an evening or two of eating, drinking and generally having a good time. On a cold January night, as a storm rolls in from sea, there’s almost nothing you’d want to do more…


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